ARCHETYPE VARIABLE

It’s 2040 – Books have completely gone extinct. Arch&Type, a graphic design studio founded by Amélie Neyrinck, Oliwia Marzec and Martijn Mertens is the only company trying to revive this forgotten medium.

Archetype Variable is a grotesque twist on uncial script. It’s used for both the branding and visual identity of the studio, as well as the Arch&Type Catalogue – in which it is set completely.

ARCH&TYPE

Uncial is a majuscule script written entirely in capital letters and commonly used from the 4th to 8th centuries AD by Latin and Greek scribes. Early uncial script likely developed from late Old Roman cursive.

Uncial, in calligraphy, ancient majuscular book hand characterized by simple, rounded strokes. It apparently originated in the 2nd century AD when the codex form of book developed along with the growing use of parchment and vellum as writing surfaces. Unlike its prototype square roman, uncial is adapted to direct strokes of the pen held in one position and was thus the natural favourite of scribes; most of the works of Latin literature for more than 500 years were copied in this hand.

Arch&type 2040

Uncial is a majuscule script written entirely in capital letters and commonly used from the 4th to 8th centuries AD by Latin and Greek scribes. Early uncial script likely developed from late Old Roman cursive.

Uncial, in calligraphy, ancient majuscular book hand characterized by simple, rounded strokes. It apparently originated in the 2nd century AD when the codex form of book developed along with the growing use of parchment and vellum as writing surfaces. Unlike its prototype square roman, uncial is adapted to direct strokes of the pen held in one position and was thus the natural favourite of scribes; most of the works of Latin literature for more than 500 years were copied in this hand.

Arch&type 2040

Uncial is a majuscule script written entirely in capital letters and commonly used from the 4th to 8th centuries AD by Latin and Greek scribes. Early uncial script likely developed from late Old Roman cursive.

Uncial is a majuscule script written entirely in capital letters and commonly used from the 4th to 8th centuries AD by Latin and Greek scribes.

Early uncial script likely developed from late Old Roman cursive. Early forms are characterized by broad single stroke letters using simple round forms taking advantage of the new parchment and vellum surfaces, as opposed to the angular, multiple stroke letters, which are more suited for rougher surfaces, such as papyrus. In the oldest examples of uncial, such as the fragment of De bellis macedonicis in the British Library, of the late 1st-early 2nd century, all of the letters are disconnected from one another, and word separation is typically not used. Word separation, however, is characteristic of later uncial usage.

As the script evolved over the centuries, the characters became more complex. Specifically flourishes and exaggerations of the basic strokes began to appear in more manuscripts. Ascenders and descenders were the first major alterations, followed by twists of the tool in the basic stroke and overlapping. By the time the more compact minuscule scripts arose circa AD 800, some of the evolved uncial styles formed the basis for these simplified, smaller scripts. Uncial was still used, particularly for copies of the Bible, tapering off until around the 10th century. There are over 500 surviving copies of uncial script, by far the largest number prior to the Carolingian Renaissance.

There is some doubt about the original meaning of the word. Uncial itself probably comes from St. Jerome's preface to the Book of Job, where it is found in the form uncialibus, but it is possible that this is a misreading of inicialibus, and Jerome may have been referring to the larger initial letters found at the beginning of paragraphs.

Basic Glyphs
Western European Accented
Figures
Symbols & Punctuation

ARCH&TYPE SAMPLE WORK

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